Archive | March, 2012

friday blinks – 3/30/12

30 Mar

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

App that locates NYC subway art
The ‘Arts for Transit’ app, “created by the Metropolitan Transport Authority and app firm Meridian, tells the locations of hundreds of artworks throughout the historic New York subway.” Find the sculptures, murals, installations and other works dating back to the 1980s, as well as background info, photos, and audio or video podcasts about each artist. Nerds will also like this app. It will guide them to bookstores and help them find a particular book in the store. It’s like a nerd magnet.
(via The Creative Finder/twitter)

How Creativity Works
Interesting NPR interview with author and editor Jonah Lehrer, about his new book called Imagine: How Creativity Works. I think I need to take more breaks. It seems like I’ve been overwhelmed lately, hitting more walls (creatively and physically) than usual. Also, a short promo video from Jonah Lehrer.
(via my wife, Holly Gatton) (via UCDA/twitter)

Tiny cards
What a better way to make a point that you work with small businesses than to get super tiny business cards? That’s what one Alberta, Canada-based bookkeeping business did. Measureing 1” x .6”, these little guys were letterpress printed by Minneapolis-based Studio On Fire. They had to make a special die just to cut them down to size. Brilliant!
(via Cranky Pressman/twitter) (via Studio On Fire/twitter)

Ten Steps to Becoming the Designer You Want to Be
Great list of 10 things to do on a regular basis to be all you can be, design-wise.
(via Linda Sanderson)

Dan Cassaro rides the Highway
Designer, illustrator and highway extraordinaire Dan Cassaro shows off his newest type masterpiece. Highway, which was initially created on the road, traveling across the U.S. of A. this past summer, then completed in his home studio in New York. Check it out and safe driving.
(via Grain Edit/twitter)(via Dan Cassaro/twitter)

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3/23/12 – friday blinks

23 Mar

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks. And with the e-wizardry available to me, I have made it look like I didn’t forget to post this on Friday. Tricky, eh?

One Minute With Jeff Rogers
Great little interview with NYC-based illustrator and designer Jeff Rogers.
(via Jeff Rogers/twitter)

Project Re:Brief
Google introduces an amazing idea to re-envision four of the most iconic advertising campaigns with the help of their original creators, to develop a new way to experience the brand and campaign through the web.
(via Riley Cran/twitter)

Illustrated Longshot Magazine recap
Longshot Magazine’s second edition, “The Debt issue” was created in 48 hours by a team of thousands of writers, editors, artists, photographers, programmers, videographers, and other creatives. A majority of the work was done in the Gawker Media offices in NYC, but some was done remotely in Portland. This is a view of how it all went down, through illustrations and tweets.
(via Kern and Burn/twitter)

The People’s Pennant
Celebrate the everyday achievement with a hand-made in the U.S.A. limited edition felt pennant! Cool idea brought to you by Jessica Heltzel and Tim Hoover (of Kern and Burn book fame), and great identity work from Eric R. Mortensen.
(via Eric R. Mortensen/twitter)

Courage, Faith, and Cocktails
James Victore has dreamed up a doozie this time. Five full days, James Victore and 5 of today’s top creatives, and eight guests. All of these wonderful things come together for a dinner series, full of work, thinking, and discussion.
(via James Victore/twitter)

 

Jeff Staple

22 Mar


Jeff Staple is a creative director, designer, and founder of NYC-based Staple Design Studio, which isn’t just a creative agency. It’s a multi-faceted beast of a company that also houses clothing lines, apparel collections, a retail store, an art gallery, and a magazine. It would be an understatement to say that Jeff is a busy guy. He’s been doing his thing for 15 years now, day in, day out and it seems like he is quite comfortable wearing many different hats. Just watch these videos and you’ll see why he’s so successful. He’s super bright, talented, and very driven. Jeff seems like a great motivator and I can’t wait to hear him give a lecture tomorrow at Virginia Tech with NYC-based designer and illustrator Sophia Chang. The lecture is called Creativity vs. Commerce: Getting In and Staying In, sponsored by Virginia Tech’s AIGA chapter and the Virginia Tech Student Hip-Hop Organization. If you are near by, you really should come and check them out. It’s bound to be great.

Jeff and Sophia, thank you so much for making a trip all the way to Virginia Tech to talk to us and our community. It’s really inspirational to know that people out there willing to take time out of their busy lives to talk with the Tech students and other local creatives.

friday blinks – 3/16/12

16 Mar

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks. Sorry there are only 2 links this week. I’ve been crazy busy lately and haven’t been paying much attention to my twitter feed.

Design Resources for people who design things and then print them
A fantastic resource for print designers.
(via Amelia Liarakos)

Instagram for people who love type
Fontli, a social network for type enthusiasts, accessible through your iPhone, can be used to take, share, and even research the usage of just about any typeface out there. What I find really cool and a great resource/idea is that you can tag it with the font name, designer, or foundry. Only connected to MyFonts, though.
(via Erik Spiekermann/twitter)

Free Font Friday
30 Free Fonts list from DesignModo (via GoMedia/twitter)

friday blinks – 3/9/12

9 Mar

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

James Victore’s YouTube Channel
This dude is full of energy and I love it. It’s so refreshing to see someone who’s been in the game this long and still full of piss and vigor. Inspiring and impressive.
(via James Victore/twitter)

Glasgow Press’ Impressive promo
Glasgow Press just sent out a letterpress promo pack featuring 5 postcards with lyrics from songs by some of graphic designer Kerr Vernon’s favorite Glasgow-based bands. Awesome.
(via Creative Review/blog)

Interview with Adam R. Garcia
A beautifully-shot interview and with the very talented creative director, designer, and illustrator Adam R. Garcia, created by Portland-based designer Ryan J. Bush. “Move around. Be an idiot. Be a part of the community. Make things that are compelling and meaningful. Think about what you make.” Nice ending, too. It was nice to see Adam break out from those very deep thoughts.
(via Greg Fisk/twitter) (via Adam Garcia/twitter)

Camera + Drill = interesting view of our world
French designer Oscar Lhermitte straps a digital camera, filming at 15 frames per second, onto a drill that spins 20 revolutions per second. I could totally see this treatment as a title sequence for a movie.
(via Under Consideration/twitter)

Advice from John C Jay
Great list of 10 tips from Wieden+Kennedy’s John C Jay. I especially like #7.
(via Greg Fisk/twitter)

Free Font Friday
Practice Foundry, a Canadian-based, “independent type foundry and a collective space for showcasing the work of amateur type designers in Canada.” They want to beef up the Canadian typographic presence with a pay-as-you’d-like model. Pretty sweet idea, eh?
(via Dylan Moore)

friday blinks – 3/2/12

2 Mar

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

Jumpman HTML5 site
WOAH! Super slick.
(via Chris Streger/twitter)

Triforce Tribute
Design + crafts + everything Zelda. I never played the game (ZELDA NERDS REVOLT!), but can get behind some serious geekery for the game. This show is sure to be very successful.
(via David Sizemore/twitter)

Jeff Rogers makes a font baby
Beautiful two-ply, hand-made font by NYC-based designer/illustrator Jeff Rogers.
(via Ryan Feerer/twitter)

Annual report powered by the sun
Austria Solar commissioned the first annual report powered by the sun. Its content remains invisible until sunlight falls on its pages. Design work by serviceplan campaign. This is really cool.
(via David Sizemore/twitter)

Weapons Declassified: Jeff Finley
Weapons of Mass Creation Fest founder Jeff Finley gets featured, and talks about how WMC Fest came to be and the concept behind it. Pissed I won’t be able to make it up to Cleveland this year for WMC Fest. Next time, Gadget…
(via Jeff Finley/twitter)

PressPausePlay

1 Mar

I went to a viewing of PressPausePlay Tuesday night, hosted by the Virigina Tech AIGA chapter. It is a fantastically filmed/edited/designed documentary, talking with some of the world’s most influential authors, musicians, directors, creatives, and entrepreneurs. Over the past 10 years, our culture has turned into a technological grab bag of sorts, where you can create just about anything in the comfort of your bedroom. The points and counterpoints from those who were interviewed for the film were asking if this flood of content, ranging from ‘trash’ to ‘excellent’ content (whether that be music, design, video editing, etc.) is a good or bad thing? Is the crap work choking out all of the great work, not allowing it to be seen? Does great content only available through the big production companies, or can equal-quality work come from a guy sitting in his basement?

The take-away from this film (that I got from it, at least) was that yes, there are a ton of creative people out there. Some professionally trained, some not. Some have natural talent and others don’t. Most of the time, the ones that seem to be able to wade above the sea of crappy work are the ones that have a good design sense, have some sort of basic knowledge about design/music/rhythm. Basically, a strong foundation. That might be attributed to formal schooling, hands-on training from a mentor, industry experience, a combination of all or some of these or whatever. My thought is if you have that solid foundation, you have a better chance of being found and excelling in your respective industry. No matter if you are up-to-date on the latest software out there, with all of those fancy tools, you still need a firm grasp on the basics. It certainly will help if you are well-versed with the latest and greatest software and other gadgetry, but it’s not a must.

After the film was over, Tim Austin, a student in the Visual Communications Design program at Virginia Tech, asked the other students if they thought they were at disadvantage because they were brought up in a digital age and surrounded by technology in their formative years? There was a general consensus that as long as you knew your stuff, you’d do fine. Being in the design industry for 10 years now, and having done some hands on non-digital “stuff” (screen printing, film development, offset printing, old-fashioned paste up), I can say I respect the history of the craft. I’m not sure if that’s an advantage or not, but I don’t think it hurts to know how certain processes used to be done.

So, if you haven’t already seen this movie, download it and watch it. Do you think the glut of mediocre work out there is overwhelming the great work? I’m interested to see what others think on this topic, so add a comment below.