Tag Archives: art

friday blinks – 4/27/12

27 Apr

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

Stay Up Late
Michael Bierut, Partner of Pentagram Design New York explains how staying up late allowed him to get a competitive edge, grow, get better, get faster, and ultimately propel his career by working a self-motivated second shift. I’ve been trying to do this lately and I seem to have more creative energy throughout the day.
(via Gabby Valdespino/twitter)

Process of an 11-color screen print
Registration craziness.
(via Jay Schaul/twitter) (via Adam Garcia/twitter)

I am Big Bird
If you or anyone else you know has ever watched Sesame Street, please watch or share this. I was never a big Big Bird fan…I always thought he was a giant, whiny bird with constant nasal congestion. But watching this gave me chills.
(via Jerry Hsiao/twitter)

Gradients…
Samuel L. Jackson explains.
(via Chris Allen)

Parra gets weird
Dutch artist Parra kills it with a huge mural, titled “Weirded Out” in the SFMOMA. Love this guy’s style. Big, bold, simple…oh and boobs.
(via Secret Castle/blog/twitter) (via Parra/twitter)

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friday blinks – 3/30/12

30 Mar

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

App that locates NYC subway art
The ‘Arts for Transit’ app, “created by the Metropolitan Transport Authority and app firm Meridian, tells the locations of hundreds of artworks throughout the historic New York subway.” Find the sculptures, murals, installations and other works dating back to the 1980s, as well as background info, photos, and audio or video podcasts about each artist. Nerds will also like this app. It will guide them to bookstores and help them find a particular book in the store. It’s like a nerd magnet.
(via The Creative Finder/twitter)

How Creativity Works
Interesting NPR interview with author and editor Jonah Lehrer, about his new book called Imagine: How Creativity Works. I think I need to take more breaks. It seems like I’ve been overwhelmed lately, hitting more walls (creatively and physically) than usual. Also, a short promo video from Jonah Lehrer.
(via my wife, Holly Gatton) (via UCDA/twitter)

Tiny cards
What a better way to make a point that you work with small businesses than to get super tiny business cards? That’s what one Alberta, Canada-based bookkeeping business did. Measureing 1” x .6”, these little guys were letterpress printed by Minneapolis-based Studio On Fire. They had to make a special die just to cut them down to size. Brilliant!
(via Cranky Pressman/twitter) (via Studio On Fire/twitter)

Ten Steps to Becoming the Designer You Want to Be
Great list of 10 things to do on a regular basis to be all you can be, design-wise.
(via Linda Sanderson)

Dan Cassaro rides the Highway
Designer, illustrator and highway extraordinaire Dan Cassaro shows off his newest type masterpiece. Highway, which was initially created on the road, traveling across the U.S. of A. this past summer, then completed in his home studio in New York. Check it out and safe driving.
(via Grain Edit/twitter)(via Dan Cassaro/twitter)

friday blinks – 2/3/12

3 Feb

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

Icons, icons, and icons
An impressive amount of super high quality icons done by Tim Boelaars.
(via Taylor Pemberton/twitter)

The Office of Nature Blog
Run by designer and illustrator Katherine Patton, this blog is a very nice “collection of neat things.”
(via Mikey Burton/twitter)

New Desks for a new Studio
522 Industries build two beautiful desks for Title Case, the new San Francisco-based studio of Jessica Hische and Erik Marinovich (1/2 of Friends of Type).
(via Jessica Hische/twitter)

The Eye Writer
Artist Tony Quan was diagnosed with ALS, and lost the ability to use almost all of his body, except his eyes and brain. With the help of some crafty friends, he is able to draw and create art again. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t get chills from this video.
(via Greg Christman/twitter)

Ira Glass on Storytelling
Nice, short video explaining how creative people go through stages of work.
(via Dave Yakley/twitter)

Free Font Friday
Archive by Slava Kirilenko (via Hannes Beer/twitter)

In other news…
If you didn’t see yesterday, I made a post about my trip to two of Roanoke’s print shops, Press Press Merch and Appalachia Press. Ad2 Roanoke was behind this great lunchtime tour. Check it out if you haven’t already.

friday blinks – 10/28/11

28 Oct

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

Pharmacy M by Caan Architecten
Awesome Belgian pharmacy design. So clean.
(via Matt Stevens/twitter)

Lessons Learned from Two Years of Tees
“Make shit great.” Rule to live by, folks.
(via Mig Reyes/twitter)

Eli, no! book by Katie Kirk
Really nicely-illustrated kids book by Katie Kirk.
(via Riley Cran/twitter)

Halloween Prints by Methane
Super sweet and detailed posters by the folks at Methane Studios.
(via Grain Edit/twitter)

Skin Disease Canvas
Creepy, but neat.
(via Eric Shalley/twitter)

Tymn Armstrong

2 Jun

Tymn Armstrong is a graphic designer, illustrator, art director, copywriter, and typographer, but he prefers to simply be called “a designer.” He has recently been hired by San Francisco-based Space Dog Books as an art director and designer, handling their in-house branding and book design. It seems that Space Dog’s books would be a must-have for any parent with young children. I might have to pick up an iPad after all.

Tymn’s style is illustration-heavy which can make an orthodontist look cool or help many businesses represent themselves in a very smart way. Not only are the marks he designs solid, there is tons of thought behind them. You can tell Tymn does lots of research and thinking in the concepting process. I also love the fact that he shares select pages from his sketchbook.

Congrats on the new job and thanks for the inspiration, Tymn!

(via Jon Ashcroft/twitter)

Dana Tanamachi

20 May

Dana Tanamachi is a graphic designer, custom chalk letterer and currently resides in Brooklyn, NY. According to her website, she enjoys crafting, reading, walking, and listening to Country music from the 1990s. Based on that, I picture Dana bobbing her head, listening to Achy Breaky Heart on her yellow Sony Walkman while chalk dust flies all over the place.

She got her start in NYC working at SpotCo designing posters for Broadway shows, but now works at Louise Fili, with previously featured designer, John Passafiume.

Her preferred medium is chalk, which is so bad ass. It would be my favorite too, if my illustration and hand-made typography was as good as her’s. I understand that chalk is meant to be temporary, but I was wondering if anyone who wanted a more permanent sign has sealed over her work so it wouldn’t get smudged/ruined? I know I would if I were them.

Beautiful work, Dana!

(via John Passafiume/twitter)

John Passafiume

10 May


John Passafiume is a Brooklyn, NY-based graphic designer, illustrator, and typographer who has created some really impressive stuff. He works for Louise Fili in NYC; a logo, packaging, restaurant, and book design specialist, where he has created a book cover for the new Steven Heller/Louis Fili colaboration, Scripts, as well as the always awesome, Blue Q. Although John’s done some outstanding work at his 9-5, the piece that really stands out to me is a hand-lettered wedding invitation for his friends, Alex & Adela.

Before John joined the corporate design world, he spent 700 hours creating a 32 x 40 inch, hand-drawn/typeset masterpiece he calls “(Process).” He said this piece was a kind of backlash against modern design culture and pop culture in general. I’d say so. Hand typesetting a piece of that size and that much small type is crazy, especially since he created this while taking time off from using his computer because of some wrist trouble (carpal tunnel?).

All of that work wasn’t all for naught. John has won such honors as “Best of Student Work” and a Gold Louie at the XXIV Louie Awards in Louisville, a “Best of Show” at the Dallas Society of Visual Communications National Student Show, where he also received a scholarship for typography from Neenah Paper. He also won a trip to New York for the 87th Art Director’s Club of NY Awards, where he was the only student participant to win a “Gold Cube.” Passafiume was selected as a finalist for the 2008 Adobe Design Achievement Awards, which is widely known as “the Oscars of the design world,” where he won his category, Print Communications. “(Process)” was also selected to be in Print Magazine‘s 2009 Regional Design Annual, and at the National American Advertising Federation (AAF) Addy Awards in Atlanta, he took home the “Gold Award” and “Special Judge’s Award.” John was honored with The 55th Type Director’s Club Competition’s “Citation of Typographic Excellence” and was selected as “Judge’s Choice.”  The piece has been shown in galleries around the world, including China, Argentina, Ireland and Malaysia, and a design professor in Tokyo has asked for a copy of the piece to show his typography students.

Fantastic work, John!

(via Dan Cassaro/twitter)

Heath Killen

6 May

,

Heath Killen is an Australia-based graphic designer and illustrator who has a rather unique style. It’s a mix of hand-illustrated pieces, photo montage, and sometimes a combination of computer-generated and/or handwritten type, which has a very nice balance. The photo placement and cropping are interesting in themselves, then he adds in the type, color, and texture which makes each piece even more intriguing.

Heath has designed a ton of self-initiated spec. work for film, music, and the arts. I think these production companies should take note and hire this guy to do their actual promo art for their movie/music/theater productions.

Wonderful work, Heath! Thanks for the inspiration.

(via Skinny Ships)

Ryan Feerer

3 May


Ryan Feerer is a graphic designer, illustrator, and instructor based in Abilene, TX. He got his education in Texas and NYC, and at the School of Visual Arts, learned from some of the best in the business (Steven Heller, Milton Glaser, and Stefan Sagmeister, to name a few). He earned his masters in design, then worked at Funny Garbage in NYC for a few years as a web designer. There, he worked with kid-friendly clients such as Teen Nick, Nicktoons, PBS kids, HIT Entertainment, and the always-adorable Lil Jon. He then picked up with his wife and moved back to Texas, where he recently help form Abidesco (Abilene Design Co.). He also teaches at Abilene Christian University where he got his undergrad and where his passion for design started. Full circle.

Ryan’s style is very hands-on. Lots of hand-drawn type, flourishes, and truck-loads of character. I really enjoyed the series of portraits that he did, that were sold on an artsy, online store called Elsewares. I wonder if Ryan would be willing to draw me and my family (hint, hint). I also loved the identity he did for Betty & June, a boutique in Abilene, Texas, where he chose to hand-stampe all of the bags, tags, and business cards. Nice touch.

I get the feeling that he really enjoys what he does. It certainly shows through the work he has done. Great stuff, Ryan! Thanks for the inspiration.

(via Jeff Rogers)

Jeff Rogers

27 Apr

Jeff Rogers is a New York City-based graphic designer, art director, and illustrator who has been working as a designer at SpotCo creating key art for broadway shows since 2008. He also does a fair amount of freelance design and illustration. Jeff’s style is definitely hand-crafted, which is a little messy, but absolutely beautiful. Continuing with his hand-drawn techniques, he also seems to use a lot of typography and illustration in his work, too. It may be the colors he chooses, but it seems to have a vintage, 50s feel to it.

Really nice, original work, Jeff! Thanks for the inspiration.