Tag Archives: creative

friday blinks – 8/24/12

24 Aug

FRIDAYBLINKS One can steal ideas, but no one can steal execution or passion. 8/24/2012 // PMS 113 // quote by Tim Ferriss

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

2012 Type Trends
See what’s happening in the world of type this year.
(via Creative Bloq/twitter)

FontStruct
This modular type builder allows you to construct, share, download and use actual fonts that you have made, using their palette of shapes and tools. Pretty awesome.
(via Creative Bloq/twitter)

The Setup
Interviews of various creative people asking what they use to get their jobs done. Unique behind-the-screen look.
(via Tina Roth Eisenberg/twitter)

Love the Box with Timothy Goodman
An illustrated guide on how to research, deconstruct, personalize “the box,” then go forth.
(via Print Magazine/twitter) (via Timothy Goodman/twitter)

Look/See Sun God Special Edition Sunglasses

Portland-based designer Adam Garcia collaborates with high-end eye wear maker Look/See to create some killer sunglasses with tons of small details that make these specs highly desirable…at least to me.
(via Adam Garcia/twitter)

friday blinks – 7/13/12

13 Jul

FRIDAYBLINKS A good designer may not have all the answers, but he knows which questions to ask. 7/13/2012 // PMS 107 // quote by RUDY DUKE

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

The Great Discontent interview with Aaron Draplin
Take the afternoon off, read, and go kick some ass. Serious motivation jammed in this interview.
(via Print Mafia/twitter)

Mike Rohde: The Sketchnoter

Mike Rohde shares his “sketchnoting” technique; a great way to reference and remember your notes. Don’t take boring notes anymore. Also, a bonus of Mike’s book cover process.
(via United Pixelworkers/twitter) (via Mike Rohde/twitter)

The best all-over camo printed shirts ever

Very clever and simple idea.
(via Printmaking Journal/twitter)

Font Bomb
Blow up any website. No hackers needed.
(via Mike Metz/twitter)

Designed Space
Gives you a peek into some of the world’s coolest agencies and their spaces, going from larger shops all the way down to a two-person team.
(via David Sizemore/twitter)

And in other news…
Over the past week, I have rolled over 9,000 all-time views. I’m sure most of them are by me and Russian spam bots, but I think they are really observant, design-savvy people who happen to live in Russia. I’ll take what I can get, so thanks for the views,  Lyubochka, Pankrati, and Svyatoslav.

Also, be on the look out for a 2- or 3-post wrap up of WMC Fest next week.

friday blinks – 4/6/12

6 Apr

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

The Boneyard Project
Art exhibit mastermind Eric Firestone came up with this fantastic idea. Invite street artist to paint the decaying US Air Force planes in the Arizona desert. Some really incredibly-detailed themed planes out there.
(via Hannes Beer/twitter)

Portland Creative Mornings with Aaron Draplin
Dickhead mountain. Asshole Peak. Purple: don’t do it. Shitwhack. Draplin is awesome. A true inspiration that I want to see speak in person. Bad.
(via Matt Goold/twitter) (via Aaron Draplin/twitter)

Newsweek: Mad Men edition
Smart idea. Taking today’s ads and adding a 60s flair to them. I think most of the ads were successful now and could have been in the early 60s asl well.
(via The Creative Finder/twitter)

Go Media shares what they’ve been up to
I find this incredibly awesome. Showing the behind-the-scenes of everyday work for a rather small creative agency like Go Media is really nice, highlighting what everyone does over a month’s time, down to accounting and lunches. I also like that they do things as a group outside of work. Granted, this was celebrating time at their agency, but still. It’s great that relationships can extend past the time clock.
(via GoMedia/blog)

Make rubber stamp envelope liners
This is for you crafty folks out there who like to make the inside of your envelopes look nice. I hope that the people receiving the cards don’t open them like a bunch of savages. Now, it’s time to make a pattern stamp!
(via Megan Kirby/twitter)

PressPausePlay

1 Mar

I went to a viewing of PressPausePlay Tuesday night, hosted by the Virigina Tech AIGA chapter. It is a fantastically filmed/edited/designed documentary, talking with some of the world’s most influential authors, musicians, directors, creatives, and entrepreneurs. Over the past 10 years, our culture has turned into a technological grab bag of sorts, where you can create just about anything in the comfort of your bedroom. The points and counterpoints from those who were interviewed for the film were asking if this flood of content, ranging from ‘trash’ to ‘excellent’ content (whether that be music, design, video editing, etc.) is a good or bad thing? Is the crap work choking out all of the great work, not allowing it to be seen? Does great content only available through the big production companies, or can equal-quality work come from a guy sitting in his basement?

The take-away from this film (that I got from it, at least) was that yes, there are a ton of creative people out there. Some professionally trained, some not. Some have natural talent and others don’t. Most of the time, the ones that seem to be able to wade above the sea of crappy work are the ones that have a good design sense, have some sort of basic knowledge about design/music/rhythm. Basically, a strong foundation. That might be attributed to formal schooling, hands-on training from a mentor, industry experience, a combination of all or some of these or whatever. My thought is if you have that solid foundation, you have a better chance of being found and excelling in your respective industry. No matter if you are up-to-date on the latest software out there, with all of those fancy tools, you still need a firm grasp on the basics. It certainly will help if you are well-versed with the latest and greatest software and other gadgetry, but it’s not a must.

After the film was over, Tim Austin, a student in the Visual Communications Design program at Virginia Tech, asked the other students if they thought they were at disadvantage because they were brought up in a digital age and surrounded by technology in their formative years? There was a general consensus that as long as you knew your stuff, you’d do fine. Being in the design industry for 10 years now, and having done some hands on non-digital “stuff” (screen printing, film development, offset printing, old-fashioned paste up), I can say I respect the history of the craft. I’m not sure if that’s an advantage or not, but I don’t think it hurts to know how certain processes used to be done.

So, if you haven’t already seen this movie, download it and watch it. Do you think the glut of mediocre work out there is overwhelming the great work? I’m interested to see what others think on this topic, so add a comment below.

friday blinks – 2/3/12

3 Feb

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

Icons, icons, and icons
An impressive amount of super high quality icons done by Tim Boelaars.
(via Taylor Pemberton/twitter)

The Office of Nature Blog
Run by designer and illustrator Katherine Patton, this blog is a very nice “collection of neat things.”
(via Mikey Burton/twitter)

New Desks for a new Studio
522 Industries build two beautiful desks for Title Case, the new San Francisco-based studio of Jessica Hische and Erik Marinovich (1/2 of Friends of Type).
(via Jessica Hische/twitter)

The Eye Writer
Artist Tony Quan was diagnosed with ALS, and lost the ability to use almost all of his body, except his eyes and brain. With the help of some crafty friends, he is able to draw and create art again. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t get chills from this video.
(via Greg Christman/twitter)

Ira Glass on Storytelling
Nice, short video explaining how creative people go through stages of work.
(via Dave Yakley/twitter)

Free Font Friday
Archive by Slava Kirilenko (via Hannes Beer/twitter)

In other news…
If you didn’t see yesterday, I made a post about my trip to two of Roanoke’s print shops, Press Press Merch and Appalachia Press. Ad2 Roanoke was behind this great lunchtime tour. Check it out if you haven’t already.

creative exercise – creature derby

19 Jan

As I have mentioned in a previous post, at my current job, with the help of our team, I run a weekly “idea meeting” on Fridays.  Since our dear colleague, Katie Gehrt, was leaving us for an awesome job opportunity in Kentucky, we decided that we needed to do something special for her last idea meeting/last day in the office.  I put a call out to think of something good for her last idea meeting with us. We decided that since Katie was headed to Kentucky, that a Kentucky Derby theme was in order. I had an idea, shared it with the team, and we ran with it. I broke out some painters tape and a giant straight edge, measuring ever four inches for the “track” game board spaces.

Now, for the creative part: create a horse, paper monster, or whatever your heart desires and name your creature. There was a wide range of creatures: a super-accurate realist horse and racer, an animal cracker-sized horse, a daisy duke jort-wearing bear, a cubist horse, a piece of toast with a long tongue, a Scooby-Doo-looking horse and racer, a pink slime monster, and a green horned monster.

From left to right: ClipArt™ (Katie), Tongue Lasher (Jennifer), Run On Sentence (Rachel), The Gobbler (Sara), Happy (Emily), Bearly Legal (Brian), The Blob? (Suzanne), 2 Cute 2 Lose (Dylan)

I also encouraged everyone to make a derby hat, tie, or any other derby accessory with whatever we had around the office.

Dylan brought some “Pick your nose” cups, which are always funny.

After the decorating was over, we got down to business and raced our creatures along the track. There were conspiracy theories that I somehow rigged the paper die to keep rolling sixes. Whatever the case may be, I won, with Katie in a close second, and Sara rounded out the top three.

Although there was no direct connection to design, sometimes activities like this one get us away from our desks and refresh our brains, allowing us to renew ourselves and keep fresh.

creative exercise – let it roll

26 Oct

At my current job, I have been given the opportunity to hold weekly “Idea meetings.” These are held late Friday morning to cap off the week with any work-related idea farming, or just to share what anyone is currently working on or has recently finished. Then, if time allows, we do some sort of an activity, usually pulled from my Caffeine for the Creative Team book. A few weeks ago, I had an idea that I thought I would try out.

I brought a bunch of empty paper towel and toilet paper rolls in and asked our team members to bring a pair of scissors with them. The instructions were as follows: Create anything out of these rolls using only scissors (no tape, glue, etc.). The concept behind this challenge was that we are given very little to work with on a daily basis, and expected to turn it into something great. This is something we deal with all the time, granted our clients don’t bring us a bag of cardboard before we start a project for them, but the overall concept is the same. You could use any type of raw material to do this type of activity, too. I would like to do this again using a completely different medium, but similar parameters.

The team seemed to enjoy the activity and the creations turned out great. Here they are:

Castle by Leah

Totem Pole by Suzanne

Moustache Dude by Dylan

Aviator Glasses by Brian (me), Aviator helmet by Melanie

Brooch by Jennifer

Evan Stremke

13 May

Evan Stremke is a Madison, WI-based graphic designer, illustrator, and all-around creative thinker. He’s currently working for Planet Propaganda, but does a fair amount of work on the side. Evan seems to have somewhat of an obsession with history. What was the reason it happened, the impact it caused, and the aftermath of the event all seem to be part of each piece he creates. One of his on-going projects is the Invitation to an Assassination series. Not only does it glorify the person who’s life was cut short, but what role these powerful leaders had in our society.

Another project Evan is working on and just announced earlier this week is his Momentus Project. He describes it as “The visualization of the most defining moments in United States history.” This list includes wars, expeditions, the birth of flight, natural and man-made catastrophes, and presidential elections. I can’t wait to see some of these summed up in one image. It’s bound to be strong and meaningful.

Check out Evan’s thoughts on twitter, shots on dribbble, and his DesignerMX mix, too.

Thank you for the inspiration, Evan. I’m excited to see what’s to come.

(via Darren Booth/twitter)

Vicki Young

12 Apr

Vicki Young, a multidisciplinary designer living and working in London, gives her top ten tips for starting your own business. I’d say this is good advice for anyone in the design field. I especially like #9 and #10. There is “no place for negativity” and “anything is possible.”

Vicki also has some nice work, proven by her 2010 Baby Pencil, a D&AD student award. Check it out.

(via D&AD)