Tag Archives: film

friday blinks – 3/9/12

9 Mar

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

James Victore’s YouTube Channel
This dude is full of energy and I love it. It’s so refreshing to see someone who’s been in the game this long and still full of piss and vigor. Inspiring and impressive.
(via James Victore/twitter)

Glasgow Press’ Impressive promo
Glasgow Press just sent out a letterpress promo pack featuring 5 postcards with lyrics from songs by some of graphic designer Kerr Vernon’s favorite Glasgow-based bands. Awesome.
(via Creative Review/blog)

Interview with Adam R. Garcia
A beautifully-shot interview and with the very talented creative director, designer, and illustrator Adam R. Garcia, created by Portland-based designer Ryan J. Bush. “Move around. Be an idiot. Be a part of the community. Make things that are compelling and meaningful. Think about what you make.” Nice ending, too. It was nice to see Adam break out from those very deep thoughts.
(via Greg Fisk/twitter) (via Adam Garcia/twitter)

Camera + Drill = interesting view of our world
French designer Oscar Lhermitte straps a digital camera, filming at 15 frames per second, onto a drill that spins 20 revolutions per second. I could totally see this treatment as a title sequence for a movie.
(via Under Consideration/twitter)

Advice from John C Jay
Great list of 10 tips from Wieden+Kennedy’s John C Jay. I especially like #7.
(via Greg Fisk/twitter)

Free Font Friday
Practice Foundry, a Canadian-based, “independent type foundry and a collective space for showcasing the work of amateur type designers in Canada.” They want to beef up the Canadian typographic presence with a pay-as-you’d-like model. Pretty sweet idea, eh?
(via Dylan Moore)

PressPausePlay

1 Mar

I went to a viewing of PressPausePlay Tuesday night, hosted by the Virigina Tech AIGA chapter. It is a fantastically filmed/edited/designed documentary, talking with some of the world’s most influential authors, musicians, directors, creatives, and entrepreneurs. Over the past 10 years, our culture has turned into a technological grab bag of sorts, where you can create just about anything in the comfort of your bedroom. The points and counterpoints from those who were interviewed for the film were asking if this flood of content, ranging from ‘trash’ to ‘excellent’ content (whether that be music, design, video editing, etc.) is a good or bad thing? Is the crap work choking out all of the great work, not allowing it to be seen? Does great content only available through the big production companies, or can equal-quality work come from a guy sitting in his basement?

The take-away from this film (that I got from it, at least) was that yes, there are a ton of creative people out there. Some professionally trained, some not. Some have natural talent and others don’t. Most of the time, the ones that seem to be able to wade above the sea of crappy work are the ones that have a good design sense, have some sort of basic knowledge about design/music/rhythm. Basically, a strong foundation. That might be attributed to formal schooling, hands-on training from a mentor, industry experience, a combination of all or some of these or whatever. My thought is if you have that solid foundation, you have a better chance of being found and excelling in your respective industry. No matter if you are up-to-date on the latest software out there, with all of those fancy tools, you still need a firm grasp on the basics. It certainly will help if you are well-versed with the latest and greatest software and other gadgetry, but it’s not a must.

After the film was over, Tim Austin, a student in the Visual Communications Design program at Virginia Tech, asked the other students if they thought they were at disadvantage because they were brought up in a digital age and surrounded by technology in their formative years? There was a general consensus that as long as you knew your stuff, you’d do fine. Being in the design industry for 10 years now, and having done some hands on non-digital “stuff” (screen printing, film development, offset printing, old-fashioned paste up), I can say I respect the history of the craft. I’m not sure if that’s an advantage or not, but I don’t think it hurts to know how certain processes used to be done.

So, if you haven’t already seen this movie, download it and watch it. Do you think the glut of mediocre work out there is overwhelming the great work? I’m interested to see what others think on this topic, so add a comment below.

friday blinks – 1/20/11

20 Jan

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

A Journey in Typography
A blog curated by U.K. designer Ged Palmer. What a fantastic collection.
(via Jeff Rogers/twitter)

The Master Cleanse
Awesome short film with titles by Erik Marinovich, ½ of Friends of Type. Wear your headphones…NSFW stuff.
(via Friends of Type/twitter)

White room + stickers + kids
Artist Yayoi Kusama constructed a stark white space installed in the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Then over two weeks time, gave child visitors thousands of colorful stickers to decorate however they wished, resulting in an extremely brightly-colored room. Very cool.
(via Stephen Kissel/twitter)

Fotoshop by Adobé
Jokes and jokes and jokes and jokes.
(via Evan Stremke/twitter)

How to Make a Font
Minneapolis-based type designer Chank Diesel makes a 5-point list on how to create your own typeface! Easy peasy.
(via Chank Diesel/twitter)

In other news…
This is my 100th post here on designblinks! Thanks for all of the sharing and support. I hope to make this into an even better-running blogity machine in 2012.