Tag Archives: video

friday blinks – 5/11/12

11 May

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks.

Poster series designed in the spirit of public radio
Minneapolis, MN-based illustrator/designer Ross Bruggink illustrated a series of posters based on his four favorite NPR radio shows. Ross has been so kind as to provide said illustrations as high-res, downloadable jpgs. Download. Print. Share. Thanks Ross!
(via Ross Bruggink/twitter)

Aaron Draplin talks with some Young Creative Brits

The Young Creative Council sits down (via Skype) with Mr. DDC himself, Aaron Draplin. Go to art school if you can, work late, and make cool shit. Wise words from a honest, wise man.
(via Aaron Draplin/twitter) (via Young Creative Council/twitter)

NYC in (stop)motion

This amazing look at New York City highlights the fact that this city never sleeps, utilizing crazy stop-motion techniques. Photos/video by Rochester, NY-based Josh Owens.
(via Matt Knisely/twitter) (Josh Owens/twitter)

Fail Better

Very neat, hand-cut paper look illustration video showing how to keeping your nose on the grind stone…again and again and again.
(via Greg Fisk/twitter)

Ferocious Quarterly, Issue 3

Team Ferocious and friends have done it again. No.3: “Be Prepared.” The survival issue is on the presses and looks to be available next Wednesday (5/16) through their website and in stores in June. From the preview, it looks amazing.
(via Ferocious Quarterly/twitter) (via Nate Utesch/twitter)

In other news…
I discovered some designers via twitter this week, two of which just launched new sites. Their collective work is really great. Check them out and follow them on their respective channels.

Chris Rushing: New York City-based designer and illustrator
(via Patrick Macomber/twitter)(via Chris Rushing/twitter)

Brent Couchman: San Francisco, CA-based designer and illustrator
(via Evan Stremke/twitter) (via Brent Couchman/twitter)

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friday blinks – 4/20/12

20 Apr

Here is a list of sites we’ve come across throughout the past couple weeks that we think are worth sharing. We call it friday blinks. Looks like I almost made an all-video post without trying. Huh…

Portland Creative Mornings with Kate Bingaman Burt

Create. Share. Repeat. Draw every day. As you can see from the video, Kate is extremely entertaining and super energetic! I’m super excited to see her speak live at WMCfest 2012!
(via Adam Garcia/twitter) (via Kate Bingaman Burt/twitter)

Good Books “Metamorphosis”

An insanely-visual trip to a rather normal book website, Good Books. Also, the Behind-the-Scenes look from concept to completion. Concept by String Theory and directed by Buck.
(via Chris Allen)

Smokeable book for Snoop

Leave it to Snoop (with help from creative agency Pereira & O’Dell) to think up this doozy. A book made of rolling paper pages, a hemp tweed cover, and a matchstick striker spine. I don’t think this one will last very long in the public library system. Posted this on 4/20 without trying. Self high five.
(via Drea Zlanabitnig/twitter)

Erik Spiekermann puts the face back in typeface

This is always teamwork. Work in teams and change the place you live in. Get in there and break things open. Graphic design CAN changes lives. I hope I’m in the right place at the right time and work with some fantastic people as Mr. Spiekermann has.
(via Erik Spiekermann/twitter)

Prima Peaches packaging
Awesome 3-color packaging, label, and set of icons for southern California grower, Prima, designed/illustrated by Patrick Macomber.
(via Patrick Macomber/twitter)

PressPausePlay

1 Mar

I went to a viewing of PressPausePlay Tuesday night, hosted by the Virigina Tech AIGA chapter. It is a fantastically filmed/edited/designed documentary, talking with some of the world’s most influential authors, musicians, directors, creatives, and entrepreneurs. Over the past 10 years, our culture has turned into a technological grab bag of sorts, where you can create just about anything in the comfort of your bedroom. The points and counterpoints from those who were interviewed for the film were asking if this flood of content, ranging from ‘trash’ to ‘excellent’ content (whether that be music, design, video editing, etc.) is a good or bad thing? Is the crap work choking out all of the great work, not allowing it to be seen? Does great content only available through the big production companies, or can equal-quality work come from a guy sitting in his basement?

The take-away from this film (that I got from it, at least) was that yes, there are a ton of creative people out there. Some professionally trained, some not. Some have natural talent and others don’t. Most of the time, the ones that seem to be able to wade above the sea of crappy work are the ones that have a good design sense, have some sort of basic knowledge about design/music/rhythm. Basically, a strong foundation. That might be attributed to formal schooling, hands-on training from a mentor, industry experience, a combination of all or some of these or whatever. My thought is if you have that solid foundation, you have a better chance of being found and excelling in your respective industry. No matter if you are up-to-date on the latest software out there, with all of those fancy tools, you still need a firm grasp on the basics. It certainly will help if you are well-versed with the latest and greatest software and other gadgetry, but it’s not a must.

After the film was over, Tim Austin, a student in the Visual Communications Design program at Virginia Tech, asked the other students if they thought they were at disadvantage because they were brought up in a digital age and surrounded by technology in their formative years? There was a general consensus that as long as you knew your stuff, you’d do fine. Being in the design industry for 10 years now, and having done some hands on non-digital “stuff” (screen printing, film development, offset printing, old-fashioned paste up), I can say I respect the history of the craft. I’m not sure if that’s an advantage or not, but I don’t think it hurts to know how certain processes used to be done.

So, if you haven’t already seen this movie, download it and watch it. Do you think the glut of mediocre work out there is overwhelming the great work? I’m interested to see what others think on this topic, so add a comment below.

Michael Jeter

27 May

Michael Jeter is a full-bearded San Francisco, CA-based graphic designer, illustrator, animator, and art director currently working for I Shot Him. He is also the co-creator and curator of the Black Harbor, an “online art and design magazine featuring prominent young designers, illustrators, photographers, film-makers, and dreamers.” I’d say that’s an understatement. The work they feature is super top-notch and very impressive, sometimes showing process, others just straight-up bad ass illustration work.

Michael’s work definitely fits in the same “super bad ass illustration” category. Technical, detailed, sometimes dark and creepy, and others which have a vintage feel with tons of texture. His Sexy, Sex, Sex posters that were featured in O.K. Periodical’s body issue are truly hilarious and awesome.

Fantastic stuff, Michael!

(via Evan Stremke/twitter)